Are. See. Be.

"... and remind them of God."

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Meanwhile, my grandiose writing projects were all going nowhere for the same tedious reason. The minute I tried to commit them to paper, or otherwise turn them into something tangible, my imagination coughed and sputtered like the cheap Renault convertible my girlfriend drove in college. I’d write a bit of dialogue using that miraculous software that automatically formats it into a screenplay for you, and I’d be instantly paralyzed from the neck up. Here was incontrovertible evidence that I wasn’t half as good as I imagined myself to be. The voices I heard so clearly and powerfully in my head became inert and alien on the page. I was surprised by how mortally embarrassed you can be by writing something nobody else will ever read. Even looking back over those one- sentence descriptions of TV ideas in the first paragraph of this essay, I am humbled by how inadequately they convey the vividness they had as I conjured them. It’s like hearing a recording of my own voice. That can’t be how I sound. Oh, but it is.
Penned by Hugo Lindgren, editor of the New York Times Magazine. I couldn’t agree more.

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But on Tuesday, during the first extended interview in several years, Lackey said he had no regrets about coming to Boston and vowed to change the narrative.


“I thought this place would be good for me,’’ Lackey said. “I’m a guy who likes competing and showing some emotion and that is what they want. When I’m pitching well, I think it’ll be a good thing. And I’m going to pitch well. This thing isn’t over.”

After bruising years, Lackey ready to take mound - Baseball - Boston.com

I really, really like Lackey’s attitude here. And I think he’s dead on. If he pitches well, Red Sox Nation will love him. If he doesn’t, he could be on his way out just like Josh Beckett a few months ago.

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But Abraham is hardly the only problem these days. The Boston sports media, once considered one of the country’s best and most influential press corps, is stumbling toward irrelevance. The national media not only seems to break more big Boston sports stories than the local press, but also often features more sophisticated analysis, especially when it comes to using advanced statistics. To put it bluntly, “The Lodge”—as Fred Toucher, cohost of the 98.5 The Sports Hub morning radio show, mockingly refers to the city’s clubby, self-important media establishment—is clogged with stale reporters, crotchety columnists, and shameless blowhards. Their canned “hot sports takes” have found a home on local television and talk radio, but do little but suck the fun out of a topic that’s supposed to be just that. And we haven’t even gotten to Dan Shaughnessy yet.

The Fellowship of the Miserable: How Boston Sportswriters Got So Awful

An interesting read. I don’t want to say I agree with everything, but there are some valid points and some not-so-valid points.

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"NORTHAMPTON, Mass. — Two men are being held on charges they stole nearly $400 from a group of Girl Scouts selling cookies at a store in Massachusetts. An adult supervising the Scouts suffered a broken nose and arm injuries trying to stop the men.


Authorities say 22-year-old Nicholas Taverna of Greenfield and 25-year-old Cassidy Michalski of Deerfield were held on $5,000 bail each at their arraignment Tuesday on charges of unarmed robbery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and shoplifting.


Police say the suspects stole two cellphones from the Walmart in Northampton on Saturday and tried to trade them for drugs in Holyoke. When that failed, they returned to Northampton where they had seen the 11- and 12-year-old Scouts earlier, and stole their cash box.”

2 men charged with stealing nearly $400 from Girl Scouts selling cookies at Mass. store - The Washington Post

Really?

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You guys know J.D., kind of laid-back. I’m laid-back, but probably hold a little more emotion on my shoulder," Drew said. "At the end of the day, me and J.D., I’m a different person than J.D. and J.D. is different than me. I told people coming into it, J.D. plays right field; I play shortstop. I’ve got a little more pressure playing in the middle of the infield and kind of dealt with that. I’ve always been under my two older brothers. It’s nothing new to me.
Welcome to Boston, Stephen Drew! I’m one of the few J.D. fans in Red Sox Nation. Glad to see another No. 7 named Drew. … Extra Bases - Red Sox blog

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No wonder Game 2 of the ALCS featured thousands of empty seats, like Game 1 before it, and like the do-or-die Game 5 of the ALDS, too. New Yorkers understand a fraud when they see it. They pay for expensive seats, drink overpriced beers, buy exorbitant merchandise and fund a $200 million joke, a team that for the second straight game couldn’t score a measly run off the Detroit Tigers’ Nos. 3 and 4 starting pitchers. These Yankees earned every last boo.
Yahoo’s Jeff Passan on the “fraud” Yankees. I love that word. Fraud. So powerful. It means so much. The Yankees are frauds and their fans are, too. What a shame to see that stadium so empty for an ALCS game.

Filed under yankees yahoo passan

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It is not an exaggeration to say this could be the most well-rounded offense they have had in the Brady/Belichick era, and yes, that includes 2007. The running game won’t match what they had in 1976 or ‘78 in John Hannah’s heyday, or even in the mid-80s with Craig James and Tony Collins. But it’s a heck of a lot better than the tap-dancing Laurence Maroney gave them five years ago, and it could be the best they’ve had since Corey Dillon was at the peak of his powers.
The Globe’s Chad Finn on Stevan Ridley and the improved Patriots running game. If you haven’t figured it out, Ridley is a serious NFL running back. He’s got the skills to be a perennial 1,000-yard rusher. He’s explosive and he fights for every yard. Those are the kind of backs I love.

Filed under patriots globe finn

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The batters were scared of Johnny, who was just wild enough to fire an occasional fastball under their chin and remind them of God.
Pat Jordan looks back on his life as a baseball player. A really great story from SB Nation. This line has nothing to do with Pat himself — just one of his rivals — but I love the line so much. “… and remind them of God.” Beautiful sentence.

Filed under sb nation longform